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Bake a Difference with USC Challah for Hunger

Bake a Difference with USC Challah for Hunger


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As we all share our favorite ways to fill our tummies, some of us can’t help but think about those in our country who can’t do the same. Hunger is a pervasive issue worldwide, but it can also be seen in our own backyards. One in every six Americans face hunger every day. Los Angeles County, known for Beverly Hills wealth and gold Amex cards, is the most food insecure county in the nation, with nearly 650,000 children who struggle daily with getting proper nutrition.

With these shocking statistics staring us in the face, college campuses all over the country are rallying against the issue. Clubs and organizations are popping up everywhere, filled with passionate and dedicated people in order to combat this national crisis. One such group is Challah for Hunger, an organization dedicated to bringing awareness to food insecurity and other social justice issues.

USC founded its own chapter in the Spring of 2013, and its members have dedicated themselves to raising money and awareness to help stop hunger in the U.S. Specifically, USC’s Challah for Hunger Chapter donates a portion of its money to Jewish World Watch, an organization that works to stop genocide in Darfur.

Photo by Ashley Seruya

Baking every other Thursday evening, USC Challah for Hunger brings the students of our community together, from all backgrounds and ethnicities, with the joy of baking beautiful challah bread in flavors such as chocolate chip cinnamon, rosemary & olive oil, campfire s’mores, banana nutella and many others. These freshly-baked challah, sold at $5 a loaf, help fight an issue close to home.

Photo by Ashley Seruya

If you are interested in getting involved with USC’s Challah for Hunger Chapter, please contact [email protected]

Thoughts of study days and finals already getting you down? Support USC’s Challah for Hunger Chapter by attending our Challah French Toast Brunch on Monday, May 5th, 10:30 am to 1 pm. Just in time to shoo away the Monday blues, as well as that Monday-morning-study-days-hangover. Fresh french toast made with our handmade sliced challah bread will be served, along with fresh fruit, scrambled eggs, coffee and tea. Hosted by USC Hillel, entrance will be $5 per person, or free with the purchase of a “Can I Get a Challah?” tank.

USC’s Challah for Hunger French Toast Brunch is brought to you by Cups Coffee, Hillel at USC, Challah for Hunger National and Jewish World Watch.

To see other food insecure counties, check out Feeding America’s interactive map here.

Check out Spoon University’s Northwestern Chapter’s Challah for Hunger article here.

Interested in more challah? Check out Spoon’s archives here.

Photo by Ashley Seruya

Make your own challah at home with MIT’s Challah for Hunger Chapter’s challah dough recipe:

This recipe makes approximately four 1-lb loaves.

Ingredients:

2 ½ cups warm water

1 tbsp active dry yeast

½ cup oil

¾ cups sugar

½ tbsp salt

6-8 cups all-purpose flour

Directions:

Add to a large bowl: 2 ½ cups warm water, sprinkle 1 tbsp yeast over the surface of the water. Wait a couple minutes for the yeast to soften; the yeast will not look dry anymore.

Mix in: ½ cup oil, ¾ cups sugar and ½ tbsp salt

Mix in: 1 cup flour

Measure: 5 cups flour

Mix in the additional flour a cup or two at a time. The mixture should start to resemble dough.

Mix in: up to 2 additional cups flour, a little at a time. Once the dough becomes less soft and sticky and more solid, remove the dough from the bowl and knead for 10 – 12 minutes. If the dough is sticking to your hands or the table, add more flour.

How to tell if the dough has been kneaded enough: The dough will look smooth and have a consistent texture all the way through (it’s ok if the dough isn’t perfectly smooth, it will get smoother after rising), the dough will slightly push back at you as you are kneading it, it won’t feel so soft anymore, and will hold its shape, the dough shouldn’t be too sticky, the dough should be stretchy.

Photo by Ashley Seruya

Return the dough to the bowl: cover it with plastic wrap, and let rise until doubled in volume (make sure the bowl is sufficiently large for this).

To Bake: Separate the dough into 10 oz portions and braid. Top them with egg wash. Place them onto a greased baking sheet, and bake in an oven set at 450 degrees for approximately 30 minutes, or until the top starts to brown.

View the original post, Bake a Difference with USC Challah for Hunger, on Spoon University.

Check out more good stuff from Spoon University here:

  • 12 ways to eat cookie butter
  • Ultimate Chipotle Menu Hacks
  • Copycat Chick-Fil-A sandwich recipe
  • The Science Behind Food Cravings
  • How to Make Your Own Almond Flour

Challah for Hunger Tackles Campus Food Insecurity

Esther D. Kustanowitz is a Contributing Writer at the Jewish Journal. She previously was the Founding Editor at GrokNation.com. She is an experienced freelance writer and consultant specializing in social media, pop culture, grief and Jewish community conversation. She is frequently sought-after as a source on social media engagement and culture, and is known as a Jewish community social influencer.

Challah for Hunger’s student activists get ready to bake challah. The bread is then sold to other students and the proceeds are donated to organizations fighting hunger. Photo courtesy of Challah for Hunger

To fight the growing problem of food insecurity on university campuses, nonprofit organization Challah for Hunger has mobilized a cohort of eight student volunteers to learn from experts and develop and implement campus-specific test programs to feed students in need. The eight students leading the project come from seven schools: USC, UC Davis, the State University of New York at Binghamton, the University of Arizona, the University of Virginia, Temple University and the University of Wisconsin (which has two student representatives).

Challah for Hunger also recently released a report on campus hunger, with data gleaned from interviews conducted by student volunteers at 22 colleges and universities between August 2016 and May 2017. During the interviews, approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus, but 65 percent said there was no official campuswide policy addressing food insecurity.

Those who participate in the cohort do so in addition to their volunteer commitments to the local chapters of Challah for Hunger, which has mobilized students as campus activists since its founding by Eli Winkelman at Scripps College in 2004. Now, at 80 student-led, college-based chapters in 30 U.S. states, the United Kingdom and Australia, students bake and sell challah. Fifty percent of profits are donated to local anti-hunger organizations, and the other half goes toward Challah for Hunger’s national and philanthropic education partner, MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger. To date, Challah for Hunger has raised and donated over $1 million to these causes.

Approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus.

“There are three core values that unite members of the cohort: education, advocacy and philanthropy,” said Talia Berday Sacks, Challah for Hunger’s director of campus programs. With each campus having different needs, the student training is “an opportunity to home in on what it means to be an advocate for yourself and your peers. As a result of participating in the Campus Hunger Project, students feel more prepared to address important social issues like hunger. This is so important, in a time of political uncertainty, that our student activists can find their voices and be a force for positive change.”

The students learn about how campus hunger is tied to other social justice issues, like affordability and diversity, and are empowered to look at their own campuses and make a difference. For example, Rachel Kartin, a senior who represents USC in the cohort, said, “One of the greatest issues is lack of awareness by a lot of the students,” explaining that despite a perception that USC students are affluent, many are food insecure. To address this, the school has a Virtual Food Pantry that provides gift cards to Trader Joe’s and three ‘Grab-and-Go’ food pantries. Kartin aims to raise awareness even further.

“There’s been important work already,” Berday Sacks said. “We don’t want them rebuilding the wheel. We want them to connect with the right networks: financial aid, student affairs, administration.”

Kartin, for example, is working with a university government representative to craft a blurb that professors can use on their syllabi, “to increase awareness of hunger and food insecurity without embarrassing people,” as Kartin said, noting that a statement about disability awareness is already on syllabi to enable students with special needs to have those needs met.

“Before this became standard, it was probably something people were embarrassed about,” Kartin said. “I’m hoping to do something everyone can see. I’m hoping to start with the professors that I know and hopefully it will spread.”


Challah for Hunger Tackles Campus Food Insecurity

Esther D. Kustanowitz is a Contributing Writer at the Jewish Journal. She previously was the Founding Editor at GrokNation.com. She is an experienced freelance writer and consultant specializing in social media, pop culture, grief and Jewish community conversation. She is frequently sought-after as a source on social media engagement and culture, and is known as a Jewish community social influencer.

Challah for Hunger’s student activists get ready to bake challah. The bread is then sold to other students and the proceeds are donated to organizations fighting hunger. Photo courtesy of Challah for Hunger

To fight the growing problem of food insecurity on university campuses, nonprofit organization Challah for Hunger has mobilized a cohort of eight student volunteers to learn from experts and develop and implement campus-specific test programs to feed students in need. The eight students leading the project come from seven schools: USC, UC Davis, the State University of New York at Binghamton, the University of Arizona, the University of Virginia, Temple University and the University of Wisconsin (which has two student representatives).

Challah for Hunger also recently released a report on campus hunger, with data gleaned from interviews conducted by student volunteers at 22 colleges and universities between August 2016 and May 2017. During the interviews, approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus, but 65 percent said there was no official campuswide policy addressing food insecurity.

Those who participate in the cohort do so in addition to their volunteer commitments to the local chapters of Challah for Hunger, which has mobilized students as campus activists since its founding by Eli Winkelman at Scripps College in 2004. Now, at 80 student-led, college-based chapters in 30 U.S. states, the United Kingdom and Australia, students bake and sell challah. Fifty percent of profits are donated to local anti-hunger organizations, and the other half goes toward Challah for Hunger’s national and philanthropic education partner, MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger. To date, Challah for Hunger has raised and donated over $1 million to these causes.

Approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus.

“There are three core values that unite members of the cohort: education, advocacy and philanthropy,” said Talia Berday Sacks, Challah for Hunger’s director of campus programs. With each campus having different needs, the student training is “an opportunity to home in on what it means to be an advocate for yourself and your peers. As a result of participating in the Campus Hunger Project, students feel more prepared to address important social issues like hunger. This is so important, in a time of political uncertainty, that our student activists can find their voices and be a force for positive change.”

The students learn about how campus hunger is tied to other social justice issues, like affordability and diversity, and are empowered to look at their own campuses and make a difference. For example, Rachel Kartin, a senior who represents USC in the cohort, said, “One of the greatest issues is lack of awareness by a lot of the students,” explaining that despite a perception that USC students are affluent, many are food insecure. To address this, the school has a Virtual Food Pantry that provides gift cards to Trader Joe’s and three ‘Grab-and-Go’ food pantries. Kartin aims to raise awareness even further.

“There’s been important work already,” Berday Sacks said. “We don’t want them rebuilding the wheel. We want them to connect with the right networks: financial aid, student affairs, administration.”

Kartin, for example, is working with a university government representative to craft a blurb that professors can use on their syllabi, “to increase awareness of hunger and food insecurity without embarrassing people,” as Kartin said, noting that a statement about disability awareness is already on syllabi to enable students with special needs to have those needs met.

“Before this became standard, it was probably something people were embarrassed about,” Kartin said. “I’m hoping to do something everyone can see. I’m hoping to start with the professors that I know and hopefully it will spread.”


Challah for Hunger Tackles Campus Food Insecurity

Esther D. Kustanowitz is a Contributing Writer at the Jewish Journal. She previously was the Founding Editor at GrokNation.com. She is an experienced freelance writer and consultant specializing in social media, pop culture, grief and Jewish community conversation. She is frequently sought-after as a source on social media engagement and culture, and is known as a Jewish community social influencer.

Challah for Hunger’s student activists get ready to bake challah. The bread is then sold to other students and the proceeds are donated to organizations fighting hunger. Photo courtesy of Challah for Hunger

To fight the growing problem of food insecurity on university campuses, nonprofit organization Challah for Hunger has mobilized a cohort of eight student volunteers to learn from experts and develop and implement campus-specific test programs to feed students in need. The eight students leading the project come from seven schools: USC, UC Davis, the State University of New York at Binghamton, the University of Arizona, the University of Virginia, Temple University and the University of Wisconsin (which has two student representatives).

Challah for Hunger also recently released a report on campus hunger, with data gleaned from interviews conducted by student volunteers at 22 colleges and universities between August 2016 and May 2017. During the interviews, approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus, but 65 percent said there was no official campuswide policy addressing food insecurity.

Those who participate in the cohort do so in addition to their volunteer commitments to the local chapters of Challah for Hunger, which has mobilized students as campus activists since its founding by Eli Winkelman at Scripps College in 2004. Now, at 80 student-led, college-based chapters in 30 U.S. states, the United Kingdom and Australia, students bake and sell challah. Fifty percent of profits are donated to local anti-hunger organizations, and the other half goes toward Challah for Hunger’s national and philanthropic education partner, MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger. To date, Challah for Hunger has raised and donated over $1 million to these causes.

Approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus.

“There are three core values that unite members of the cohort: education, advocacy and philanthropy,” said Talia Berday Sacks, Challah for Hunger’s director of campus programs. With each campus having different needs, the student training is “an opportunity to home in on what it means to be an advocate for yourself and your peers. As a result of participating in the Campus Hunger Project, students feel more prepared to address important social issues like hunger. This is so important, in a time of political uncertainty, that our student activists can find their voices and be a force for positive change.”

The students learn about how campus hunger is tied to other social justice issues, like affordability and diversity, and are empowered to look at their own campuses and make a difference. For example, Rachel Kartin, a senior who represents USC in the cohort, said, “One of the greatest issues is lack of awareness by a lot of the students,” explaining that despite a perception that USC students are affluent, many are food insecure. To address this, the school has a Virtual Food Pantry that provides gift cards to Trader Joe’s and three ‘Grab-and-Go’ food pantries. Kartin aims to raise awareness even further.

“There’s been important work already,” Berday Sacks said. “We don’t want them rebuilding the wheel. We want them to connect with the right networks: financial aid, student affairs, administration.”

Kartin, for example, is working with a university government representative to craft a blurb that professors can use on their syllabi, “to increase awareness of hunger and food insecurity without embarrassing people,” as Kartin said, noting that a statement about disability awareness is already on syllabi to enable students with special needs to have those needs met.

“Before this became standard, it was probably something people were embarrassed about,” Kartin said. “I’m hoping to do something everyone can see. I’m hoping to start with the professors that I know and hopefully it will spread.”


Challah for Hunger Tackles Campus Food Insecurity

Esther D. Kustanowitz is a Contributing Writer at the Jewish Journal. She previously was the Founding Editor at GrokNation.com. She is an experienced freelance writer and consultant specializing in social media, pop culture, grief and Jewish community conversation. She is frequently sought-after as a source on social media engagement and culture, and is known as a Jewish community social influencer.

Challah for Hunger’s student activists get ready to bake challah. The bread is then sold to other students and the proceeds are donated to organizations fighting hunger. Photo courtesy of Challah for Hunger

To fight the growing problem of food insecurity on university campuses, nonprofit organization Challah for Hunger has mobilized a cohort of eight student volunteers to learn from experts and develop and implement campus-specific test programs to feed students in need. The eight students leading the project come from seven schools: USC, UC Davis, the State University of New York at Binghamton, the University of Arizona, the University of Virginia, Temple University and the University of Wisconsin (which has two student representatives).

Challah for Hunger also recently released a report on campus hunger, with data gleaned from interviews conducted by student volunteers at 22 colleges and universities between August 2016 and May 2017. During the interviews, approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus, but 65 percent said there was no official campuswide policy addressing food insecurity.

Those who participate in the cohort do so in addition to their volunteer commitments to the local chapters of Challah for Hunger, which has mobilized students as campus activists since its founding by Eli Winkelman at Scripps College in 2004. Now, at 80 student-led, college-based chapters in 30 U.S. states, the United Kingdom and Australia, students bake and sell challah. Fifty percent of profits are donated to local anti-hunger organizations, and the other half goes toward Challah for Hunger’s national and philanthropic education partner, MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger. To date, Challah for Hunger has raised and donated over $1 million to these causes.

Approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus.

“There are three core values that unite members of the cohort: education, advocacy and philanthropy,” said Talia Berday Sacks, Challah for Hunger’s director of campus programs. With each campus having different needs, the student training is “an opportunity to home in on what it means to be an advocate for yourself and your peers. As a result of participating in the Campus Hunger Project, students feel more prepared to address important social issues like hunger. This is so important, in a time of political uncertainty, that our student activists can find their voices and be a force for positive change.”

The students learn about how campus hunger is tied to other social justice issues, like affordability and diversity, and are empowered to look at their own campuses and make a difference. For example, Rachel Kartin, a senior who represents USC in the cohort, said, “One of the greatest issues is lack of awareness by a lot of the students,” explaining that despite a perception that USC students are affluent, many are food insecure. To address this, the school has a Virtual Food Pantry that provides gift cards to Trader Joe’s and three ‘Grab-and-Go’ food pantries. Kartin aims to raise awareness even further.

“There’s been important work already,” Berday Sacks said. “We don’t want them rebuilding the wheel. We want them to connect with the right networks: financial aid, student affairs, administration.”

Kartin, for example, is working with a university government representative to craft a blurb that professors can use on their syllabi, “to increase awareness of hunger and food insecurity without embarrassing people,” as Kartin said, noting that a statement about disability awareness is already on syllabi to enable students with special needs to have those needs met.

“Before this became standard, it was probably something people were embarrassed about,” Kartin said. “I’m hoping to do something everyone can see. I’m hoping to start with the professors that I know and hopefully it will spread.”


Challah for Hunger Tackles Campus Food Insecurity

Esther D. Kustanowitz is a Contributing Writer at the Jewish Journal. She previously was the Founding Editor at GrokNation.com. She is an experienced freelance writer and consultant specializing in social media, pop culture, grief and Jewish community conversation. She is frequently sought-after as a source on social media engagement and culture, and is known as a Jewish community social influencer.

Challah for Hunger’s student activists get ready to bake challah. The bread is then sold to other students and the proceeds are donated to organizations fighting hunger. Photo courtesy of Challah for Hunger

To fight the growing problem of food insecurity on university campuses, nonprofit organization Challah for Hunger has mobilized a cohort of eight student volunteers to learn from experts and develop and implement campus-specific test programs to feed students in need. The eight students leading the project come from seven schools: USC, UC Davis, the State University of New York at Binghamton, the University of Arizona, the University of Virginia, Temple University and the University of Wisconsin (which has two student representatives).

Challah for Hunger also recently released a report on campus hunger, with data gleaned from interviews conducted by student volunteers at 22 colleges and universities between August 2016 and May 2017. During the interviews, approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus, but 65 percent said there was no official campuswide policy addressing food insecurity.

Those who participate in the cohort do so in addition to their volunteer commitments to the local chapters of Challah for Hunger, which has mobilized students as campus activists since its founding by Eli Winkelman at Scripps College in 2004. Now, at 80 student-led, college-based chapters in 30 U.S. states, the United Kingdom and Australia, students bake and sell challah. Fifty percent of profits are donated to local anti-hunger organizations, and the other half goes toward Challah for Hunger’s national and philanthropic education partner, MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger. To date, Challah for Hunger has raised and donated over $1 million to these causes.

Approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus.

“There are three core values that unite members of the cohort: education, advocacy and philanthropy,” said Talia Berday Sacks, Challah for Hunger’s director of campus programs. With each campus having different needs, the student training is “an opportunity to home in on what it means to be an advocate for yourself and your peers. As a result of participating in the Campus Hunger Project, students feel more prepared to address important social issues like hunger. This is so important, in a time of political uncertainty, that our student activists can find their voices and be a force for positive change.”

The students learn about how campus hunger is tied to other social justice issues, like affordability and diversity, and are empowered to look at their own campuses and make a difference. For example, Rachel Kartin, a senior who represents USC in the cohort, said, “One of the greatest issues is lack of awareness by a lot of the students,” explaining that despite a perception that USC students are affluent, many are food insecure. To address this, the school has a Virtual Food Pantry that provides gift cards to Trader Joe’s and three ‘Grab-and-Go’ food pantries. Kartin aims to raise awareness even further.

“There’s been important work already,” Berday Sacks said. “We don’t want them rebuilding the wheel. We want them to connect with the right networks: financial aid, student affairs, administration.”

Kartin, for example, is working with a university government representative to craft a blurb that professors can use on their syllabi, “to increase awareness of hunger and food insecurity without embarrassing people,” as Kartin said, noting that a statement about disability awareness is already on syllabi to enable students with special needs to have those needs met.

“Before this became standard, it was probably something people were embarrassed about,” Kartin said. “I’m hoping to do something everyone can see. I’m hoping to start with the professors that I know and hopefully it will spread.”


Challah for Hunger Tackles Campus Food Insecurity

Esther D. Kustanowitz is a Contributing Writer at the Jewish Journal. She previously was the Founding Editor at GrokNation.com. She is an experienced freelance writer and consultant specializing in social media, pop culture, grief and Jewish community conversation. She is frequently sought-after as a source on social media engagement and culture, and is known as a Jewish community social influencer.

Challah for Hunger’s student activists get ready to bake challah. The bread is then sold to other students and the proceeds are donated to organizations fighting hunger. Photo courtesy of Challah for Hunger

To fight the growing problem of food insecurity on university campuses, nonprofit organization Challah for Hunger has mobilized a cohort of eight student volunteers to learn from experts and develop and implement campus-specific test programs to feed students in need. The eight students leading the project come from seven schools: USC, UC Davis, the State University of New York at Binghamton, the University of Arizona, the University of Virginia, Temple University and the University of Wisconsin (which has two student representatives).

Challah for Hunger also recently released a report on campus hunger, with data gleaned from interviews conducted by student volunteers at 22 colleges and universities between August 2016 and May 2017. During the interviews, approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus, but 65 percent said there was no official campuswide policy addressing food insecurity.

Those who participate in the cohort do so in addition to their volunteer commitments to the local chapters of Challah for Hunger, which has mobilized students as campus activists since its founding by Eli Winkelman at Scripps College in 2004. Now, at 80 student-led, college-based chapters in 30 U.S. states, the United Kingdom and Australia, students bake and sell challah. Fifty percent of profits are donated to local anti-hunger organizations, and the other half goes toward Challah for Hunger’s national and philanthropic education partner, MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger. To date, Challah for Hunger has raised and donated over $1 million to these causes.

Approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus.

“There are three core values that unite members of the cohort: education, advocacy and philanthropy,” said Talia Berday Sacks, Challah for Hunger’s director of campus programs. With each campus having different needs, the student training is “an opportunity to home in on what it means to be an advocate for yourself and your peers. As a result of participating in the Campus Hunger Project, students feel more prepared to address important social issues like hunger. This is so important, in a time of political uncertainty, that our student activists can find their voices and be a force for positive change.”

The students learn about how campus hunger is tied to other social justice issues, like affordability and diversity, and are empowered to look at their own campuses and make a difference. For example, Rachel Kartin, a senior who represents USC in the cohort, said, “One of the greatest issues is lack of awareness by a lot of the students,” explaining that despite a perception that USC students are affluent, many are food insecure. To address this, the school has a Virtual Food Pantry that provides gift cards to Trader Joe’s and three ‘Grab-and-Go’ food pantries. Kartin aims to raise awareness even further.

“There’s been important work already,” Berday Sacks said. “We don’t want them rebuilding the wheel. We want them to connect with the right networks: financial aid, student affairs, administration.”

Kartin, for example, is working with a university government representative to craft a blurb that professors can use on their syllabi, “to increase awareness of hunger and food insecurity without embarrassing people,” as Kartin said, noting that a statement about disability awareness is already on syllabi to enable students with special needs to have those needs met.

“Before this became standard, it was probably something people were embarrassed about,” Kartin said. “I’m hoping to do something everyone can see. I’m hoping to start with the professors that I know and hopefully it will spread.”


Challah for Hunger Tackles Campus Food Insecurity

Esther D. Kustanowitz is a Contributing Writer at the Jewish Journal. She previously was the Founding Editor at GrokNation.com. She is an experienced freelance writer and consultant specializing in social media, pop culture, grief and Jewish community conversation. She is frequently sought-after as a source on social media engagement and culture, and is known as a Jewish community social influencer.

Challah for Hunger’s student activists get ready to bake challah. The bread is then sold to other students and the proceeds are donated to organizations fighting hunger. Photo courtesy of Challah for Hunger

To fight the growing problem of food insecurity on university campuses, nonprofit organization Challah for Hunger has mobilized a cohort of eight student volunteers to learn from experts and develop and implement campus-specific test programs to feed students in need. The eight students leading the project come from seven schools: USC, UC Davis, the State University of New York at Binghamton, the University of Arizona, the University of Virginia, Temple University and the University of Wisconsin (which has two student representatives).

Challah for Hunger also recently released a report on campus hunger, with data gleaned from interviews conducted by student volunteers at 22 colleges and universities between August 2016 and May 2017. During the interviews, approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus, but 65 percent said there was no official campuswide policy addressing food insecurity.

Those who participate in the cohort do so in addition to their volunteer commitments to the local chapters of Challah for Hunger, which has mobilized students as campus activists since its founding by Eli Winkelman at Scripps College in 2004. Now, at 80 student-led, college-based chapters in 30 U.S. states, the United Kingdom and Australia, students bake and sell challah. Fifty percent of profits are donated to local anti-hunger organizations, and the other half goes toward Challah for Hunger’s national and philanthropic education partner, MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger. To date, Challah for Hunger has raised and donated over $1 million to these causes.

Approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus.

“There are three core values that unite members of the cohort: education, advocacy and philanthropy,” said Talia Berday Sacks, Challah for Hunger’s director of campus programs. With each campus having different needs, the student training is “an opportunity to home in on what it means to be an advocate for yourself and your peers. As a result of participating in the Campus Hunger Project, students feel more prepared to address important social issues like hunger. This is so important, in a time of political uncertainty, that our student activists can find their voices and be a force for positive change.”

The students learn about how campus hunger is tied to other social justice issues, like affordability and diversity, and are empowered to look at their own campuses and make a difference. For example, Rachel Kartin, a senior who represents USC in the cohort, said, “One of the greatest issues is lack of awareness by a lot of the students,” explaining that despite a perception that USC students are affluent, many are food insecure. To address this, the school has a Virtual Food Pantry that provides gift cards to Trader Joe’s and three ‘Grab-and-Go’ food pantries. Kartin aims to raise awareness even further.

“There’s been important work already,” Berday Sacks said. “We don’t want them rebuilding the wheel. We want them to connect with the right networks: financial aid, student affairs, administration.”

Kartin, for example, is working with a university government representative to craft a blurb that professors can use on their syllabi, “to increase awareness of hunger and food insecurity without embarrassing people,” as Kartin said, noting that a statement about disability awareness is already on syllabi to enable students with special needs to have those needs met.

“Before this became standard, it was probably something people were embarrassed about,” Kartin said. “I’m hoping to do something everyone can see. I’m hoping to start with the professors that I know and hopefully it will spread.”


Challah for Hunger Tackles Campus Food Insecurity

Esther D. Kustanowitz is a Contributing Writer at the Jewish Journal. She previously was the Founding Editor at GrokNation.com. She is an experienced freelance writer and consultant specializing in social media, pop culture, grief and Jewish community conversation. She is frequently sought-after as a source on social media engagement and culture, and is known as a Jewish community social influencer.

Challah for Hunger’s student activists get ready to bake challah. The bread is then sold to other students and the proceeds are donated to organizations fighting hunger. Photo courtesy of Challah for Hunger

To fight the growing problem of food insecurity on university campuses, nonprofit organization Challah for Hunger has mobilized a cohort of eight student volunteers to learn from experts and develop and implement campus-specific test programs to feed students in need. The eight students leading the project come from seven schools: USC, UC Davis, the State University of New York at Binghamton, the University of Arizona, the University of Virginia, Temple University and the University of Wisconsin (which has two student representatives).

Challah for Hunger also recently released a report on campus hunger, with data gleaned from interviews conducted by student volunteers at 22 colleges and universities between August 2016 and May 2017. During the interviews, approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus, but 65 percent said there was no official campuswide policy addressing food insecurity.

Those who participate in the cohort do so in addition to their volunteer commitments to the local chapters of Challah for Hunger, which has mobilized students as campus activists since its founding by Eli Winkelman at Scripps College in 2004. Now, at 80 student-led, college-based chapters in 30 U.S. states, the United Kingdom and Australia, students bake and sell challah. Fifty percent of profits are donated to local anti-hunger organizations, and the other half goes toward Challah for Hunger’s national and philanthropic education partner, MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger. To date, Challah for Hunger has raised and donated over $1 million to these causes.

Approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus.

“There are three core values that unite members of the cohort: education, advocacy and philanthropy,” said Talia Berday Sacks, Challah for Hunger’s director of campus programs. With each campus having different needs, the student training is “an opportunity to home in on what it means to be an advocate for yourself and your peers. As a result of participating in the Campus Hunger Project, students feel more prepared to address important social issues like hunger. This is so important, in a time of political uncertainty, that our student activists can find their voices and be a force for positive change.”

The students learn about how campus hunger is tied to other social justice issues, like affordability and diversity, and are empowered to look at their own campuses and make a difference. For example, Rachel Kartin, a senior who represents USC in the cohort, said, “One of the greatest issues is lack of awareness by a lot of the students,” explaining that despite a perception that USC students are affluent, many are food insecure. To address this, the school has a Virtual Food Pantry that provides gift cards to Trader Joe’s and three ‘Grab-and-Go’ food pantries. Kartin aims to raise awareness even further.

“There’s been important work already,” Berday Sacks said. “We don’t want them rebuilding the wheel. We want them to connect with the right networks: financial aid, student affairs, administration.”

Kartin, for example, is working with a university government representative to craft a blurb that professors can use on their syllabi, “to increase awareness of hunger and food insecurity without embarrassing people,” as Kartin said, noting that a statement about disability awareness is already on syllabi to enable students with special needs to have those needs met.

“Before this became standard, it was probably something people were embarrassed about,” Kartin said. “I’m hoping to do something everyone can see. I’m hoping to start with the professors that I know and hopefully it will spread.”


Challah for Hunger Tackles Campus Food Insecurity

Esther D. Kustanowitz is a Contributing Writer at the Jewish Journal. She previously was the Founding Editor at GrokNation.com. She is an experienced freelance writer and consultant specializing in social media, pop culture, grief and Jewish community conversation. She is frequently sought-after as a source on social media engagement and culture, and is known as a Jewish community social influencer.

Challah for Hunger’s student activists get ready to bake challah. The bread is then sold to other students and the proceeds are donated to organizations fighting hunger. Photo courtesy of Challah for Hunger

To fight the growing problem of food insecurity on university campuses, nonprofit organization Challah for Hunger has mobilized a cohort of eight student volunteers to learn from experts and develop and implement campus-specific test programs to feed students in need. The eight students leading the project come from seven schools: USC, UC Davis, the State University of New York at Binghamton, the University of Arizona, the University of Virginia, Temple University and the University of Wisconsin (which has two student representatives).

Challah for Hunger also recently released a report on campus hunger, with data gleaned from interviews conducted by student volunteers at 22 colleges and universities between August 2016 and May 2017. During the interviews, approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus, but 65 percent said there was no official campuswide policy addressing food insecurity.

Those who participate in the cohort do so in addition to their volunteer commitments to the local chapters of Challah for Hunger, which has mobilized students as campus activists since its founding by Eli Winkelman at Scripps College in 2004. Now, at 80 student-led, college-based chapters in 30 U.S. states, the United Kingdom and Australia, students bake and sell challah. Fifty percent of profits are donated to local anti-hunger organizations, and the other half goes toward Challah for Hunger’s national and philanthropic education partner, MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger. To date, Challah for Hunger has raised and donated over $1 million to these causes.

Approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus.

“There are three core values that unite members of the cohort: education, advocacy and philanthropy,” said Talia Berday Sacks, Challah for Hunger’s director of campus programs. With each campus having different needs, the student training is “an opportunity to home in on what it means to be an advocate for yourself and your peers. As a result of participating in the Campus Hunger Project, students feel more prepared to address important social issues like hunger. This is so important, in a time of political uncertainty, that our student activists can find their voices and be a force for positive change.”

The students learn about how campus hunger is tied to other social justice issues, like affordability and diversity, and are empowered to look at their own campuses and make a difference. For example, Rachel Kartin, a senior who represents USC in the cohort, said, “One of the greatest issues is lack of awareness by a lot of the students,” explaining that despite a perception that USC students are affluent, many are food insecure. To address this, the school has a Virtual Food Pantry that provides gift cards to Trader Joe’s and three ‘Grab-and-Go’ food pantries. Kartin aims to raise awareness even further.

“There’s been important work already,” Berday Sacks said. “We don’t want them rebuilding the wheel. We want them to connect with the right networks: financial aid, student affairs, administration.”

Kartin, for example, is working with a university government representative to craft a blurb that professors can use on their syllabi, “to increase awareness of hunger and food insecurity without embarrassing people,” as Kartin said, noting that a statement about disability awareness is already on syllabi to enable students with special needs to have those needs met.

“Before this became standard, it was probably something people were embarrassed about,” Kartin said. “I’m hoping to do something everyone can see. I’m hoping to start with the professors that I know and hopefully it will spread.”


Challah for Hunger Tackles Campus Food Insecurity

Esther D. Kustanowitz is a Contributing Writer at the Jewish Journal. She previously was the Founding Editor at GrokNation.com. She is an experienced freelance writer and consultant specializing in social media, pop culture, grief and Jewish community conversation. She is frequently sought-after as a source on social media engagement and culture, and is known as a Jewish community social influencer.

Challah for Hunger’s student activists get ready to bake challah. The bread is then sold to other students and the proceeds are donated to organizations fighting hunger. Photo courtesy of Challah for Hunger

To fight the growing problem of food insecurity on university campuses, nonprofit organization Challah for Hunger has mobilized a cohort of eight student volunteers to learn from experts and develop and implement campus-specific test programs to feed students in need. The eight students leading the project come from seven schools: USC, UC Davis, the State University of New York at Binghamton, the University of Arizona, the University of Virginia, Temple University and the University of Wisconsin (which has two student representatives).

Challah for Hunger also recently released a report on campus hunger, with data gleaned from interviews conducted by student volunteers at 22 colleges and universities between August 2016 and May 2017. During the interviews, approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus, but 65 percent said there was no official campuswide policy addressing food insecurity.

Those who participate in the cohort do so in addition to their volunteer commitments to the local chapters of Challah for Hunger, which has mobilized students as campus activists since its founding by Eli Winkelman at Scripps College in 2004. Now, at 80 student-led, college-based chapters in 30 U.S. states, the United Kingdom and Australia, students bake and sell challah. Fifty percent of profits are donated to local anti-hunger organizations, and the other half goes toward Challah for Hunger’s national and philanthropic education partner, MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger. To date, Challah for Hunger has raised and donated over $1 million to these causes.

Approximately 80 percent of administrators said food insecurity was a problem on their campus.

“There are three core values that unite members of the cohort: education, advocacy and philanthropy,” said Talia Berday Sacks, Challah for Hunger’s director of campus programs. With each campus having different needs, the student training is “an opportunity to home in on what it means to be an advocate for yourself and your peers. As a result of participating in the Campus Hunger Project, students feel more prepared to address important social issues like hunger. This is so important, in a time of political uncertainty, that our student activists can find their voices and be a force for positive change.”

The students learn about how campus hunger is tied to other social justice issues, like affordability and diversity, and are empowered to look at their own campuses and make a difference. For example, Rachel Kartin, a senior who represents USC in the cohort, said, “One of the greatest issues is lack of awareness by a lot of the students,” explaining that despite a perception that USC students are affluent, many are food insecure. To address this, the school has a Virtual Food Pantry that provides gift cards to Trader Joe’s and three ‘Grab-and-Go’ food pantries. Kartin aims to raise awareness even further.

“There’s been important work already,” Berday Sacks said. “We don’t want them rebuilding the wheel. We want them to connect with the right networks: financial aid, student affairs, administration.”

Kartin, for example, is working with a university government representative to craft a blurb that professors can use on their syllabi, “to increase awareness of hunger and food insecurity without embarrassing people,” as Kartin said, noting that a statement about disability awareness is already on syllabi to enable students with special needs to have those needs met.

“Before this became standard, it was probably something people were embarrassed about,” Kartin said. “I’m hoping to do something everyone can see. I’m hoping to start with the professors that I know and hopefully it will spread.”


Watch the video: Challah For Hunger


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